What is your favorite movie about a teacher?

I’m not normally a betting type other than the fun kind; you know, office pools on when a colleague’s baby will be born and such. But I would certainly bet that the film “Won’t Back Down” would easily win the “least favorite movie about a teacher” poll, if one were devised.

Rather than me talking about this particular biased film, I would rather hear what you have to say about Hollywood’s depiction of the teaching profession. I know there are some flawed films out there. Some films I have liked, my teaching friends have dismissed. But I would still love to hear it. If you don’t want to comment on the blog, you can still email me at bsandber@nysutmail.org and share your fave movie about a teacher, teaching or a school.

Here’s one comment, received via email from Dionne Francis:

The last time I went to the movies was 2006 and the only teacher movie I can recall is Stand and Deliver, starring Edward James Olmos. He played the role of Jaime Escalante a mathematics teacher in a school in a Hispanic neighborhood. He gave up a job as an engineer to take a job at Garfield High School in East Los Angeles.
The school is on the verge of being decertified by the school district due to poor academic results. He believes in his students potential but over extends himself trying to help his students and drives himself into having a mild heart attack.
Ultimately the teacher succeeded in helping his students pass their exams. I was moved by this movie because I identified with the students in the film. I believe I was one of those students who slipped through the cracks. The teacher’s actions was very admirable, he presented himself more like a parent, than a teacher.

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2 Comments

  1. Tim Southerton September 18, 2012 at 5:45 pm #

    Mr. Holland’s Opus. No movie makes a better depiction of how teachers collaborate to help kids,

  2. Don Carlisto September 19, 2012 at 11:01 am #

    Dead Poet’s Society: a perfect illustration of the impact that unconventional teaching has on young minds. John Keating would never teach to the test. Carpe Diem!

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