Marina Pisklakova: Domestic Violence

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

Marina Pisklakova

Marina Pisklakova, ©2000 Eddie Adams

LESSON GRADE LEVEL

  • 9-12

HUMAN RIGHTS ISSUES:

  • Women’s Rights, Freedom from Violence, Individual Integrity

Additional Resources
- Profile
- PDF

UNIVERSAL DECLARATION OF HUMAN RIGHTS:

  • Article 3: Right to Life, Liberty, and Personal Security
  • Article 5: Freedom from Torture and Degrading Treatment

TIME REQUIREMENT:

80 minutes

TEACHER TIP:

Domestic violence is a difficult subject to address because it is often hidden and is often a cause of shame for the victim and those close to the victim. In preparing to teach this subject, make sure to have available the names and contact details of community programs to support individuals affected by domestic violence. It is also important to explain what domestic violence is. Domestic violence is any of a series of behaviors used by one person in a relationship to control the other. Partners may be married or not married; heterosexual, gay, or lesbian; living together, separated or dating.

WHAT KIND OF BEHAVIORS CAN BE CONSIDERED DOMESTIC VIOLENCE?

If your partner:

  • Intentionally insults or embarrasses you
  • Controls any of your actions, including who you see or talk to or where you go
  • Tells you that you are a bad parent or threatens to take away or hurt your children
  • Makes all of your decisions for you
  • Prevents you from seeing loved ones, like your friends and family
  • Physically assaults you in any way
  • Takes your possessions or money and withholds it from you
  • Intimidates you with weapons
  • Destroys your possessions or threatens to kill your pets
  • Attempts to scare you
  • Threatens to do physical harm to themselves or threaten you with physical violence
  • Prevents you from going to work or school

GUIDING QUESTIONS:

  • What does it mean to be safe?
  • Where does one expect to be safe?
  • Why did the authors of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights use the language “Personal Security”?
  • Where does domestic violence occur?

OBJECTIVES

After this lesson Students will be able to:

  • Define and understand the term “gender-based violence”
  • Examine and analyze the facts and figures related to domestic violence.
  • Know who Marina Pisklakova is and the enormity of her work for survivors of violence.

STUDENT SKILLS:

  • Drawing inferences
  • Making conclusions
  • Organizing and interpreting information;
  • Participating in group planning and discussion
  • Critical thinking

NEW YORK STATE LEARNING STANDARDS:

  • Social Studies Standard 2: World History
    • Commencement KI 1 PI 1, 5; KI 2 PI 3, 4, 5; KI 3 PI 1, 2, 3; KI 4 PI 1, 2, 3, 4
  • Social Studies Standard 5: Civics, Citizenship, and Government
    • Commencement KI 1 PI 1, 3; KI 4 PI 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7
  • English Language Arts Standard 1: Language for Information and Understanding
    • Commencement Reading PI 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6; Writing PI 1, 2, 3, 4
  • English Language Arts Standard 3: Language for Critical Analysis and Evaluation
    • Commencement Reading PI 1, 2, 3, 4; Writing PI 1, 2
  • English Language Arts Standard 4: Language for Social Interaction
    • Commencement Listening/Speaking PI 1, 2, 3; Reading/Writing PI 2, 3

NYS P-12 COMMON CORE LEARNING STANDARDS for ELA/Literacy in History/Social Studies 6-12

  • RH/SS.9-10.2 Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.
  • RH/SS.9-10.4 Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including vocabulary describing political, social, or economic aspects of history/ social studies.
  • WH/SS.9-10.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
  • WH/SS.9-10.7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
  • WH/SS.9-10.9 Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.
  • RH/SS.11-12.2 Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary that makes clear the relationships among the key details and ideas.
  • WH/SS.11-12.5 Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach, focusing on addressing what is most significant for a specific purpose and audience.
  • WH/SS.11-12.7 Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects to answer a question (including a self-generated question) or solve a problem; narrow or broaden the inquiry when appropriate; synthesize multiple sources on the subject, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation.
  • WH/SS.11-12.9 Draw evidence from informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.

VOCABULARY:

  • Gender-based violence
  • Personal security
  • Domestic violence
  • Prevention
  • Relationship
  • Dissident

CONCEPTS:

  • Empathy
  • Identity
  • Justice
  • Power
  • Decision making
  • Civic values
  • Human rights

TECHNOLOGY REQUIRED:

  • Internet access

MATERIALS:

Student Activities

ANTICIPATORY SET:

  • Instruct the students to read Article 3 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.
  • Instruct the students to read the definition of domestic violence and the facts and figures.
  • After reading, instruct the students to rephrase the Article 3 based on their understanding of domestic violence.
  • Ask the students to report out orally to class via teacher-facilitated discussion.

ACTIVITY 1

  • Distribute to the class the interview with Marina Pisklakova from the Speak Truth to Power website. (symbol for link)
  • Ask students the following questions:
    • Why did Marina Pisklakova begin her work to end domestic violence in Russia?
    • What are some characteristics of domestic violence that are similar from case to case?
    • What is Marina’s functioning definition of domestic violence?
    • What is a dissident? Why would Marina’s father call her a dissident?
    • Describe how Marina has helped Russian women.

ACTIVITY 2

  • Conduct a community mapping exercise to learn about where a survivor of domestic violence can get help and support in your community. Include the health care providers, law enforcement, community non-profits, and the justice system.
  • After the mapping project is complete, pair students off and have them select one organization to interview.
  • Prior to conducting the interview, the class, as a whole, should develop at least 10 questions to ask each organization. A common set of questions will enable the class to create a report on the community’s capacity to assist victims of domestic violence.
  • Once the interviews are complete, students should work in groups of four to review their interview responses and draft a common document.
  • After the groups have met, convene the full class to draft one document outlining the similarities and differences, based on the interview questions, on how each community organization fulfills its mission to assist victims of domestic violence.
  • Students may share this document with the organizations.
  • As a result of this activity students could develop an action plan to change some aspect of the community safety net or, an acknowledgement to the city or town for doing a good job.

Become a Defender

  • Host a Personal Safety Day. Include speakers and presenters from some of the community organizations you learned about in your community mapping exercise. Make available a self-defense class.
  • Invite a speaker to address the issue of dating violence.
  • Set up a table at a popular neighborhood site and provide information about domestic violence, organizations working to stop it and opportunities for individuals to take action
  • Have a petition-signing in support of both U.S and International laws to protect women and to stop violence against women and girls.

TELL US ABOUT IT

The Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights is sponsoring an annual contest honoring a student who submits the best advocacy activity based upon the lesson studied. A goal of the lesson is to instill into each student that one voice, one person can make monumental changes in the lives of many. Tell us how you “Became a Defender”!

THE CRITERIA FOR THE CONTEST ARE:

  • A one-page summary of the advocacy activity
  • Digitized copies of materials that can be sent electronically
  • Photos of the activity (please include parental consent form)
  • A one-page summary of how the activity made a change in the lives of one person or many

THE PRIZES INCLUDE:

  • A week long “virtual” internship at RFK Center
  • An opportunity to meet the defender through a SKYPE visit,
  • A visit from Kerry Kennedy or a defender to your school
  • A poster of a Speak Truth to Power Human Rights Defender
  • A donation of a signed copy of Speak Truth to Power for the school library

The application and instructions for entry can be downloaded here (link for materials)

The deadline for all applications is the third week in November.

The winning student and teacher will be notified by the last week of January.

Additional Resources

WHO World Health Organization
http://www.who.int/en/
The World Health Organization publishes periodic reports on gender discrimination and domestic violence. Their website is a good source for teachers or students to find statistics and other information.

UNIFEM United Nations Development Fund for Women
http://www.unifem.org/
UNIFEM is a part of UN Women, and features information about gender equality and women’s empowerment on an international level.

UNFPA United Nations Population Fund
http://www.unfpa.org/public/
The UNFPA is an international development agency that works to promote every individual’s right to health and equal opportunities. They focus on population data to develop policies and programs that reduce poverty and promote overall health and well-being.

National Coalition Against Domestic Violence
http://www.ncadv.org/
NCADV is an American-based non-profit that organizes women and their allies to end violence against women and children on a national level by addressing perpetuating conditions that condone this kind of violence.

UNICEF report on domestic violence
http://www.unicef-irc.org/publications/pdf/digest6e.pdf
This report from UNICEF covers domestic violence from numerous angles. It addresses the current scope and magnitude through statistics, while also examining the causes and consequences. The UNICEF report also addresses the obligations of the state and suggests strategies and interventions.

National Domestic Violence Hotline
www.thehotline.org
A website built around the National Domestic Violence Hotline that raises awareness of domestic violence and provides services to victims, survivors and their families.

Tags: , , , , , , , ,

No comments yet.

Leave a Reply

You must be logged in to post a comment.